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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the actual history of civil rights in america. and it was great because they believe everything the new york times believes. at least the girls on the view would argue with me. one sentence summary of my book, and don't make the same mistake america. liberals have been the primary practitioners 7. every police shooting, suddenly the klan had taken of the new york city police force. like the trade on martin case, they disappear once the facts come out. the story we were hysterical about, you would know -- the black kid was -- did ambush and killing a cop, only because the stories would disappear from the news. one of the best ones was michael stewart who came to be called an artist because he was caught spraying graffiti in the subway. a dozen cops, they got him to the hospital two weeks later and he passed out and the revived demand and he was at a coma and died of pneumonia. he died as a result of police brutality despite medical examiner's saying the opposite. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter. they are acquitted and the new york times editorial the next day was remembering michae
of them before i left. will i realize people who familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america who read my book notice that they haven't read the book but that was great because they believe everything "the new york times" believes that "the new york times" doesn't argue with me. at least the gals on the few would argue with me. the one sentence summary of my book is, white skills have never produced anything good and don't make the same mistake again america. that is why it hasn't come out before the election. hits a book about racism and to my critics chagrin i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70's and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next mattel case and that is how what was treated in the media. suddenly the klan has taken over new york city police force. there are vignettes of various race hoaxes and much like the trayvon martin case, they all just disappear once the facts came out. you would never guess that this final article. atte
of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot on like to pick out these subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to our cultural history, biography. >> paul hendrickson's most recent work, hemingway's bonet is the name of the book. thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thank you for having me. >> sander and stuart taylor talk about affirmative action, oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas. they agreed with the initial goals of affirmative action. that now believe it hurts the minorities. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you very much. thank you for roger and cato for sponsoring this event, it is great to have such a great kickoff to the book which is being officially published today. i am going to start and talk a little bit about the central idea itself and some of what we found in the book. i will try to relate this more to what is happening tomorrow. i am particularly glad to be doing this at cato because it stood for
're eligible. >> when we come back, myrna, you said there's going to be a civil rights rain of fire to protect voters. i'm interested in what that might look like. more on voter empowerment in this week in voter suppression when we come back. the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin care since...olay. cc for yourself. [ female announcer ] and challenge what's possible with olay total effects cc cream. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. there's a pop. wahlalalalallala! pepper, but not pepper, i'm getting like, pep-pepper. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, zip zip zip zip zip! i'm literally getting zinged by the flavor. smooth, but crisp. velvety. kind of makes me feel like a dah zing yah woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the ind
for equal opportunity. he focuses on legal issues arising from civil rights laws including the regulatory impact on business and the problems in higher education created by affirmative action. a former deputy assistant attorney general and of ronald reagan and bush of administrations, he held the second highest positions in both the civil rights division and the environment and natural resources division. he has held several other positions in the justice department including the assistant to the solicitor general, associate deputy attorney general, and acting assistant attorney general in the office of legal policy degette ki is a graduate of yale law school. please welcome roger. [applause] >> thank you very much for that nice introduction and for inviting me today. thank you to the cato institute and rick and stuart writing this wonderful book. i am going to begin by keeping praise on rick and stuart for this book to be it's terrific. it makes an extraordinary contribution to the debate on these issues. i think it's unprecedented my contribution in many ways. i've read the book, and it
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. imillion dollars for marylanded one hundred schools.ty... question seven will double it. rushern baker: question seven will add table games and... a new casino, generating millions of dollars... every year, without raising taxes. leggett: and audits will ensure the money goes... where it's supposed to. more jobs, and millions for schools. baker: question seven will be good for our kids... our teachers, and our schools. leggett: keep maryland money in maryland. baker: please vote for question seven. leggett: vote for question seven. >>> this is fox 5 news at 10:00. >>> the presidential election is just a week away, but politics right now taking a back seat to super storm sandy. tomorrow president obama will head to new jersey to get a first hand look at the damage. earlier today he dropped by the red cross headquarters in northwest d.c. to thank everyone. >> the reason we're here is because the red cross knows what it's doi
. >> in addition to running his own grocery, sylvester also operates tours of significant blues and civil rights spots in the area. >> a lot of people are making money off it. i'm probably the only black doing it. >> this is one of the stops on sylvester's tour. it is what remains of the grocery store where emmitt till whistled at a white woman. that night he was abducted from his bed, brutally murdered, and tossed into the river. the property is owned by one of the jurors that acquitted till's killers. he wants to have a memorial here but can't because the owner has a seven figure asking price. >> everybody trying to make money off the blues and civil rights. and a lot of those people gave us the blues but now they making money off the blues. it don't taste good to a lot of people, but they doing it. >> as for ray de felitta and yvette johnson, work on their film wrapped earlier this year. >> why he spoke that way in the film -- >> "booker's place: a mississippi story" premiered in april at the tribeca film festival. >> beautiful. >> for frank and ray de felitta, it was a crowning collaboration
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
have been sent to polls across the country, invited by a number of civil rights groups, including the naacp who says there is an effort to suppress minority at the polls. the group sending the observers, the organization for security and cooperation in europe insisting its people will not interfere or influence elections in any way. some american officials are not taking any chances and guaranteeing that they will not. well, let us pause for a moment to consider what the mayor of somerville, massachusetts, has done. getting -- for getting america is the land of the free, including jealously protected -- protection of our first amendment rights, the mayor of the small city, 76,000 people in massachusetts has decided to outlaw the word illegal in connection with the phrase immigrant. they don't want to upset anybody. i said immigrant and illegal in different phrases. we don't know what he thinks it should be instead. we do know, the mayor has just made support illegal illegal. up next, it is an all-out battle for ohio. both candddates campaigning today. can the election be one anywh
. thousands of attorneys representing two major presidential candidates civil rights groups are in place policied to challenge electoral results that may be called in question by machine failures, voter suppression or other allegation of illegal activity. that is a story also in "u.s.a. today" taking a look at what happened in 2000 in florida and saying that possibly another state could be like florida in battleaybe ohio or other ground states where you could have a recount and not know who the winner of the election is. also front page of the "wall street journal" medicare complicates the senior vote. senior citizens are a coveted bloc in florida where three make bum a quarter of the electr elee and they are important to romney given the deficit among young voters and minorities. he needs not only to win among seniors but win big. in 2008 john phmccain captured e group by 8% margin but lost to president barack obama. mr. romney is leading among the elderly by 6% to 12% a sign he may be weathering a charge by democrats that he and ryan with undermine medicare. that is the "wall street jo
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
was a party for civil rights. >> exactly. >> caller: exactly. exactly, so they are trying to even pull something from 40, 50 years ago, to make up for what they don't have now. >> yeah. >> stephanie: david crosby of crosby stills and gnash -- >> what? >> stephanie: right? coming up on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, cool on the other. new ice breakers duo. a fruity, cool way to break the ice. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ [ inaudible ] ♪ ♪ it's just a good vibration ♪ ♪ it's such a dreamy sensation ♪ >> stephanie: jacki, what are you doing? >> i'm working. >> what are you doing? >> i'm working. i'm coordinating with my fabulous producer lisa on what we're going to do in the news coming up in the next segment. >> stephanie: we're a bad influence. >> we are. >> stephanie: fifty minutes after the hour. that's what we do, we get people in trouble. >> do you know how many bouquets of flowers i have to buy her now. are you aware of all of the maybing up i'm going to h
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
of reality, i think african-americans and most people in modern civilization have a long ways to go before they perceive reality in the right way that will permit them to have the kind of brotherhood that we all hope for in these great religions of christianity, judaism, islam, etc. before we can have that real brotherhood, that feeling of love for my fellow human being, i think we have to grow up and mature a lot when it comes to perceiving the realities that we think we know already, you know. i'm talking about our nation. the way i perceive our nation, i think, is very healthy for me, and i wish all african-americans could perceive this america the way i perceive it, but they don't. and the many white americans that i have become acquainted with perceive this nation as not the way that i think would give me a good life and my children a good life if i passed those feelings on to my children. so american people, in my opinion- and not only the way we perceive america, the way we look at human beings, too, human life and everything, i think we are a society of people that are far advanced
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
. we can't forget about that. we are responsive and we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provided a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders and that includes intelligence, surveillance recognizance for off the geographical combatant commanders. would provide air and missile defense. geographical combatant commanders provide logistical support for all geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key -- for aviation and information operations civil affairs military police wmd defense capabilities, corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components and military space program. for example we are responsible for everything from the satellite
is elected, we will go back to being barefoot and pregnant and the states or as they're going right now are going to start becoming small countries if power is given to them. and people in the south will see the rise again of us moving into the civil war type situation. host: before we talk to you we were talking about gender issues. do social issues whatever factor into voting there in wisconsin? guest: sure, like anywhere else they go into i think the way people line up in both parties and that's -- i don't know if it's any more true or less true in wisconsin than any other state host: california. our independent line. craig, you're on. caller: is this for me now? host: you're on, sir. go ahead. caller: i wasn't sure because you didn't list it properly. host: we're running out of time. go ahead. caller: i just want to mention because i think there's a problem with semantics in this country. and what i mean by that is everybody looks at romney from the standpoint as this man as a builder. he's not a builder he's a dismantler. and anybody that's familiar with construction fully realize
for civil rights. >> exactly. >> caller: exactly. exactly, so they are trying to even pull something from 40, 50 years ago, to make up for what they don't have now. >> yeah. >> stephanie: david crosby of crosby stills and gnash -- >> what? >> stephanie: right? coming up on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth on. also in minis. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks or jumping into the market he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ [ inaudible ] ♪ ♪ it's just a good vibration ♪ ♪ it's such a dreamy sensation ♪ >> stephanie: jacki, what are yo
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)